Jul. 8, 2020

34,000 illegal immigrants go missing in Canada

Most Canadians won’t believe this, but this is straight from the prime authority – The Auditor General .

In a new report the AG describes the broken immigration system highlighting that 34,000 illegal immigrants, that is 34,000 enforceable orders for removal, went unenforced.
 
At a time when legal Canadians  told to "Go Home, Stay Home", and unable to see loved ones in seniors homes, or having to line line up to get basic necessities this news should shock us all. 
 
How can such incompetence occur in our country and go unaddressed for years and years? 
 

A brief summary of the AG’s report:

This audit focused on whether the Canada Border Services Agency removed individuals ordered to leave Canada as soon as possible. We also examined the coordination of information shared by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, an independent tribunal, and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, which supports the agency’s monitoring and enforcement of removal orders. Various case circumstances are outside the agency’s control and can delay removal. Our audit work accounted for these delays and focused on the processing of removal orders while they were enforceable and under the agency’s control.

Why we did this audit

The audit is important because the timely removal of foreign nationals who are found inadmissible protects the integrity and fairness of Canada’s immigration system. It is also one of the most effective ways to deter those who might otherwise seek to abuse the system. In the case of criminals, timely removal protects the safety and security of Canadians. It is important to note that the agency may detain foreign nationals who it believes pose a risk or danger to the public. Continued detention or release is under the authority of the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. The examination of immigration detention was outside of the scope of this audit.

Overall message

Overall, we found that the Canada Border Services Agency’s approach to managing removal cases had not led to the timely removal of foreign nationals from Canada. Despite a recent increase in removals, about 50,000 enforceable cases had continued to accumulate in the agency’s inventory. 
 
In two thirds of these cases, the agency did not know the whereabouts of the individuals. Most of the accumulated cases had been enforceable for several years.
 
We found that poor data quality resulted in cases missing from the agency’s removal inventories. Because of delays in processing data received from federal partners, the agency did not have the information it needed to track the status of removal orders. Among cases with enforceable orders, we found that many were inactive or stalled because of poor case management, even some that were considered high priority. Furthermore, many cases we examined were stalled because of missing travel documents, such as passports—yet little was done to obtain these documents.
 
We also found that the agency did not know the whereabouts of a large number of foreign nationals who were subject to enforceable removal orders. It issued immigration warrants for their arrest but seldom completed the annual investigations to locate those with criminality.
Despite a recent increase in removals, about 50,000 enforceable cases had continued to accumulate in the agency’s inventory. In two thirds of these cases, the agency did not know the whereabouts of the individuals. Most of the accumulated cases had been enforceable for several years.
 
We found that poor data quality resulted in cases missing from the agency’s removal inventories. Because of delays in processing data received from federal partners, the agency did not have the information it needed to track the status of removal orders. Among cases with enforceable orders, we found that many were inactive or stalled because of poor case management, even some that were considered high priority. Furthermore, many cases we examined were stalled because of missing travel documents, such as passports—yet little was done to obtain these documents.
 
We also found that the agency did not know the whereabouts of a large number of foreign nationals who were subject to enforceable removal orders. It issued immigration warrants for their arrest but seldom completed the annual investigations to locate those with criminality.’